The Mindset of Motivation

Your attitude,  not your aptitude, will determine your altitude.

When I was younger, I remember seeing a motivational poster with an eagle soaring in the sky. The poster featured the phrase “Dream Big” along with the above Zig Zigler quotation. Throughout my life, I thought about that eagle and the freedom that it represented. With the right mindset, I was able to use that visual input as motivation to achievement goals.

The Tales of Two Mindsets

Do you realize that there are two main mindsets that helps determine our personal drive? Someone with a fixed mindset believes that aspects such as intelligence, characteristics and skills, and perhaps circumstances, are unchangeable or static. According to Carol Dweck, psychologist and author of Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, a fixed mindset “leads to the desire to look smart and therefore a tendency to”:

  • Avoid challenges
  • Give up easily due to obstacles
  • See effort as fruitless
  • Ignore useful feedback
  • Be threatened by the success of others

This type of mindset can be extremely danger to not only the individual and their family, but also to society in general.

Conversely, someone with a growth mindset believes that they can develop their intelligence, characteristics, skills, and circumstances. A growth mindset “leads to a desire to learn and therefore a tendency to”:

  • Embrace challenges
  • Persist despite obstacles
  • See effort as a path to mastery
  • Learn from criticism
  • Be inspired by others’ success

Encouraging a Growth Mindset

If you have a growth mindset and you are a person of influence, such as a parent, teacher, caregiver, or other type of leader, make the effort to encourage others, especially children, to embrace their ability to grow and develop themselves with hard work, planning & goal setting, and accepting help from others. Be an example by asking them to critique how YOU are doing as a person of influence in their life, and use their comments to demonstrate positive change. Teach others to discuss their challenges using positive, reaffirming statements instead words of defeat and discouragement. Also, use visual input as reminders of what they can achieve, and that which they have already achieved!

See 10 Ways to Teach Kids to Have a Growth Mindset, which includes suggested books and additional resources!

Check out the Ultimate Guide to a Growth Mindset (Plus FAQ!).

Embracing Visual Input to Increase Motivation

With a growth mindset, the concept of dreaming big is completely rational since there is an acceptance that one’s abilities and situations are not limited by what one is experiencing today. Seeing hard working parents or leaders creates a visual example which can help inspire the work ethics of a younger generation. When you plan your day, or week, and you are able to check off tasks, you can established a visual that is encouraging you to recognize your efforts and your successes, while motivating you to continue toward additional goals. Get out into nature and be inspired the always changing world that sustains us all! Create a vision board using pictures that reflect your goals and words to elevate your passion and commitment! Make time to be creative and remind yourself that your success is for you to develop and foster!

The Not Mad. Motivated. Mindset

The Not Mad. Motivated. brand was conceptualized from a growth mindset! Being Not Mad. Motivated. represents the decision to grow and succeed despite challenges and obstacles. Living among negative elements with a fixed mindset of hopelessness and anger is a quick way to a life of misery and pain. Not Mad. Motivated. wants to be a reminder of the fact that current difficulties are only temporary if you use them to motivate you into the necessary movement toward positive change. To help us spread the mindset of Motivation, purchase your Not Mad. Motivated. t-shirt today!

Coming soon: New Not Mad. Motivated. merchandise!

6 thoughts on “The Mindset of Motivation

  1. I had heard about fixed and growth mindsets but had never really looked into them. This was such a good starting point. When I started my blog I was determined to post every week. I’ve managed so far to do so for the past few months but it’s definitely the growth mindset. When I’m super busy or think I don’t have time I remind myself of what I want to achieve and how far I’ve come! Good luck with your posts!

    1. Thanks for your comment, Emma! I am glad that you were able to relate; and that you have been successful in committing to yourself and your growth as a writer. When I started blogging, I didn’t set any clear goals. My lack of writing reflected my lack of direct. Now I am planning my topics and my time to write. Having that plan really makes a difference for me.

    1. Thank you! I’ll be doing my best to do so! I hope 2020 is a great year of motivation for everyone working toward something positive for ourselves, our families, and/or our communities!💙

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: